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Who was Pete Best?

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Pete Best was The Beatles drummer from August 1960 until August 1962. He was with them in Hamburg and at their first Abbey Road recording session. He played an important role in establishing The Beatles popularity in Hamburg and Liverpool, but had a slightly distant relationship with the others. By the summer of 1962 the other Beatles were plotting against him. Using the pretext that George Martin had rejected his drumming as sub-standard they approached Ringo Starr, an old friend of the band from Hamburg.  Read the full story behind the sacking of Best (free on Medium 6 mins) The Beatles: free teaching materials

Which Beatle came from the poorest background?

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The Everton area of Liverpool, 1960 All four Beatles had what Mark Lewisohn calls ‘unvarnished working class roots’ in an industrial city that had seen better days. Two (Paul and George) spent their formative years living in social housing in areas that were solidly proletarian but not particularly associated with high crime rates or other social issues. Neither considered themselves to be poor by the standards of their peers. John Lennon On paper, John Lennon's early childhood was a textbook example of the social deprivation often experienced by single parent families in the mid Twentieth century. Though his biological parents were legally married they never lived together and effectively separated soon after his birth. John initially lived with is mother, Julia. Economic insecurity (she relied on bar work) poor accommodation shared with her then boyfriend and 'unsuitable relationships' all caused concern in her family. Her sister, Mimi, reported Julia to Liverpool soci

Why was the Walrus Paul'?

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John Lennon cheerfully admitted that he had had 'no idea' who or what was the 'eggman' was in 'I am the Walrus'.

What Paul McCartney 's first instrument?

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Paul soon abandoned the trumpet

When did The Beatles last play The Cavern?

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Which Beatles songs did Ringo write?

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Did all The Beatles come from poor homes?

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I moved in with my auntie who lived in the suburbs in a nice semi-detached place with a small garden and doctors and lawyers and that ilk living around... not the poor slummy kind of image that was projected in all the Beatles stories. In the class system, it was about half a class higher than Paul, George and Ringo, who lived in government-subsidized housing. We owned our house and had a garden. They didn't have anything like that .  Playboy Interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono: Published in January 1981  10 Admiral Grove where Ringo grew up - now owned by National Trust A slightly more accurate summary would point out that Ringo was at least  'half a class' lower than Paul and George and did not live in social housing or what the British call a council house. Dingle was one of the poorest areas of Liverpool and the Starkeys paid ten shillings (£0.50p) a week to a private landlord for 10 Admiral Grove, a terraced house without a bathroom or indoor toilet. It is also int

I Wanna be your Man

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The songwriters in surprisingly small writing How did Lennon & McCartney end up writing I Wanna be your Man for the Rolling Stones? There are at least three different versions of what happened.

What does Lennon say at end of Strawberry Fields?

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The 'Paul is Dead' conspiracy was fuelled by supposed clues hidden in the recordings I told you about strawberry fields ... You know the place where nothing is real...Well here's another clue for you all ... The walrus was Paul.

Which Beatles song was inspired by an advertising jingle?

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 It’s a throwaway, a piece of garbage...from a Kellogg’s cereal commercial. I always had the TV on very low in the background when I was writing and it came over ...{ i n this } song .  During his Weybridge years, John Lennon was a British version of Benjamin Braddock in  The Graduate  (1967). Though extraordinarily privileged in material terms he felt alienated: a rich, successful young man angry at the suburban world he found himself in. This anger was largely expressed through petty acts of passive aggression against those surrounding him.   In the conventional Beatles narrative, John Lennon was the wild man, with an artistic bent and a taste for the avant garde.  Paul, in contrast, was the son-in-law choice: cute, sensible and with the common touch.  In reality, the roles were reversed. McCartney spent his Beatle downtime careering around  Swinging London in his Mini Cooper, the pop world's Toad of Toad Hall. He was a fixture of the hip clubs, fashionable parties and talked-abo