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When did George Harrison stop taking LSD? Why?

The Beatles famously brought LSD to public attention. Less well known is that George Harrison became rapidly disillusioned about the effects of the drug on young people exposed to it. On 7 August 1967, George Harrison flew with his then wife Patti, Neil Aspinall and Derek Taylor to San Francisco.   They were there to visit George's sister, Jenny but also wanted to visit the  increasingly famous 'Hippy Heaven' area of Haight Ashbury.   Not so many flowers Are you going to  San Francisco/Be Sure to Wear Some Flowers in Your Hair Scott McKenzie released his single in May 1967. A huge hit, it acted as a siren call to those attracted by the ideas of the counter culture.  Young runaways began arriving in large numbers. Drug dealing petty criminals moved in to exploit them.  By August the situation in Haight Ashbury was spiralling out of control.  The atmosphere was especially tense during the weekend of their arrival. Four days earlier two dealers had been murdered in horrific

What did John Lennon want to sound 'like the end of the world'?

Many of the best Beatles songs start and/or finish with a bang: the opening chord or A HARD DAY'S NIGHT, for example. The opening of A DAY IN THE LIFE is unusually muted in this respect, perhaps indicating shift into more subtle musical territory.  Where A DAY IN THE LIFE delivers its knockout blow is in its finale. Originally recorded as a modest  hummed  E Major vocal chord, it evolved into what Jonathan Gould describes as:  "a forty-second meditation on finality that leaves each member of the audience listening with a new kind of attention and awareness to the sound of nothing at all". [66] ByTom Swain www.tomswain.com CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11750716 This was achieved using absurdly primitive technology in today's term. Lennon, McCartney, Evans and Martin played the chord on three pianos. Each was then multi-tracked four times. For the final chord of  A DAY IN THE LIFE  Lennon had asked George Martin for a  'a sound like t

Which song was inspired by a breakfast cereal?

‘Good Morning’ is mine. It’s a throwaway, a piece of garbage, I always thought. The ‘Good morning, good morning’ was from a Kellogg’s cereal commercial. I always had the TV on very low in the background when I Was writing and it came over and then I wrote the song. John Lennon All We Are Saying , David Sheff During his Weybridge years, John Lennon was like Benjamin Braddock The Graduate  (1967) a rich, successful young man angry at the suburban world he found himself in. Like Benjamin, this anger was largely expressed through petty acts of passive aggression against those surrounding him.   In the mid 60s, Paul spent his Beatle downtime careering around London in his Mini Cooper, the pop world's Toad of Toad Hall. John stayed in Surrey moping around his mansion in his dressing gown, being surly to all and sundry. He did not (yet) alleviate his boredom by having an affair with an older married woman, but his self-absorption shut out Cynthia and Julian. It was not a happy home. On th

Which Beatles song consists only of a chorus?

'Verse 1' consists of  the chorus from SPLHCB Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band   opens with the title track that establishes the concept (a reunion concert for the eponymous group). Crowd noise blends the sound of orchestral   musicians tuning-up to create the illusion of a live performance.  The song climaxes with the MC (McCartney) introducing 'the one and only Billy Shears' and the single chorus builds to a crescendo. Concept Arguably, the band reunion concept begins to fade at this point. Later Lennon would dismissively describe the album as 'a bunch of mainly Paul's songs'. This may be harsh but it was apparent during recording that the concept was not really sustained.  The Beatles road manager, Neil Aspinall, pointed  out that the fictional band appeared to disappear after the opening track. He suggested that listener needed to be reminded of the live performance on side two. The result was the penultimate track  " Sgt. Pepper's Lone

Which song had the working title 'Badfinger Boogie'?

Photo by  Fleur  on  Unsplash In March 1967 John and Paul were under pressure to produce the final tracks for Sergeant Pepper. They decided to have what would now be called a brainstorming session at John's house. According to Hunter Davies, this was a bewilderingly casual event in which they spent much of the time flicking through magazines. From time to time they would sing out phrases or pick out bits of tunes at the piano. Ian Macdonald speculates that there was some method at work in that 'both writers 'found inspiration in moments where their conscious minds had fallen into abeyance.' Whatever the strategy, it worked.  By the end of the day McCartney had a new song, 'The Fool on the Hill'. Lennon, meanwhile, plugged away at the chords to a tune with the working title Badfinger Boogie.  This reflection on on a minor injury would eventually became better known as 'With a Little Help From My Friends'

Five Fun Facts about The Beatles?

Which song did The Beatles sing on the first worldwide satellite broadcast? How many records have the Beatles sold? 

Who was rejected for the Sergeant Pepper album cover?

There are 87 people and props on the cover of Sergeant Pepper

Why did John Lennon not like Sergeant Pepper?

John Lennon never showed much affection for The Beatles most celebrated album. Was this because the  Sergeant Pepper concept was Paul's?  Not according to what John says in this interview, recorded in 1971, at the height of his feud with his former song-writing partner: 

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