Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts with the label 1966

Why did the Beatles stop performing live?

We were the best live band in the world before we were famous. Nobody could touch us  John Lennon.

What was the biggest concert The Beatles ever played?

Officially, the opening concert of The Beatles 1965 US tour at Shea Stadium, New York was the largest they ever did. It was the first time a major sports area was used as a music venue and the 55,000 tickets sold out in seventeen minutes. The Philippines  This was not, however, the biggest crowd The Beatles performed in front of. In July 1966 they were booked to play two gigs at the Rizal Stadium, Manila. They were told that 30,000 tickets had been sold for the afternoon show and 50,000 for the second. To their horror, however, they discovered that these figures did not remotely reflect the numbers packed in to the stadium. As George puts it in Anthology: ...when we got there it was like the Monterrey Pop Festival. There were about 200,000 people on the site. The Beatles rushed through both sets. In total they spent  less than eighty minutes on stage. They then retreated to their hotel room - only to find that they had unwittingly caused great offence to a dangerous dicta

Which Beatle supposedly 'died' in 1966?

One of the most enduring legends surrounding The Beatles is that the Fab Four became the Fab Three in November 1966.

Why did The Beatles 1966 tour of Japan start badly?

The European leg of the The Beatles 1966 world tour was designed to create a favourable impression on the band and its public. First there were a few dates in Germany, culminating in a triumphant return to Hamburg. Then on to Japan, a market where they had achieved unprec.edented penetration for a western act. Finally The Beatles would visit The Philippines. This was the most Americanised of all Asian states, with a famously friendly population.. A warm welcome was confidently expected. Nothing went according to plan. In Hamburg there was embarrassment on the now cleaned-up  Beatles in front of their old fans. At one concert Lennon told the audience, "Don't listen to our music. We're terrible these days." He would later explain: "We'd outlived the Hamburg stage and wanted to pack that up. We hated going back... We'd had that scene. Brian [Epstein] made us go back to fulfill the contract..." After this uneasy revisiting of their past, The Beat

When do we first hear an Indian influence on a Beatles record?

In June 1966 the great Indian musician Ravi Shankar visited George Harrison at his Surrey home - and played for the assembled Beatles. Two months later they recorded George's composition I WANT TO TELL YOU.  Harrison later explained that the song expressed 'an avalanche of thoughts that are so hard to write down or say' and Ian Macdonald spots the 'underlying Hindi outlook in the lyric - a karmic reference to time in the final lines ... confirmed by a descending melisma in the fade out'.  Neil Innes - who later collaborated with George Harrison on the celebrated Beatles spoof mockumentary  The Rutles   - happened to be in Abbey Road Studio as they were recording. He tells the story here:

Labels

Show more